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The "I Was Blocked For" Hashtag on Twitter

1
heidilynnrussell
For the past couple of days, there has been a hashtag trending on Twitter with the words, "I Was Blocked For." (#IWasBlockedFor)

Out of curiosity, yesterday I checked it out, and I noticed three different groups of people posting on it. I thought I'd post my observation here and see what others think about this:

1. The first group were people who seemed to have a "noble" reason for being blocked. They said they'd been blocked because they had stood up to a racist or stated their opinion about a humanitarian issue, etc.

2. The second group were people who had humorous reasons, like "I was blocked for posting photos of honey biscuits at 3 a.m."

3. And the last (and most prominent) group were obvious Twitter trolls. These are people who were either boasting about how they had taunted someone until they blocked them or who were trying to paint themselves as the "wronged" party. ("I can't believe he blocked me for that," etc.)

With the last group, what I noticed was two things:

1. Trolls are unrepentant. They think it's funny to say hurtful things until a person gets so fed up that they "block" them.

2. Trolls refuse to acknowledge their role in a disagreement. They make everything the fault of the blocker.

With this third group of people, I saw no hint of remorse or any expression that the person wanted to make amends with the person who had blocked them.

The reason I wanted to post this was this:
Some of you may have difficulty cutting ties with a person who is belittling you, harassing you or bullying you on the Internet. Sometimes it's because you run in the same social circle at school ... sometimes you want to be accepted or popular, and the person bullying you is the "leader" of the popular pack ... sometimes you are just a nice person who genuinely wants to be friends with everyone and be forgiving, etc.

It's okay to forgive someone -- we all should do that. However (and I speak from personal experience, so I'm guilty of this myself) ... it's important that you recognize when that person is doing something deliberately to tear you apart. For your own sanity and peace of mind, it is quite all right to block them.

As you can see from that Twitter hashtag, the people who were blocked 1) Either didn't care and were laughing about it or 2) Cared, because they no longer had "access" to the victim. They could no longer harass that person, and it made them incredibly angry -- and then they tried to make it the victim's fault!

The mind reels.

I'd be curious if anyone has any thoughts on this (opposite views welcome, too).

Just wanted to throw this out there as food for thought.

--Heidi.
1
Cyberninja
Typical trolls on patrol behaviour. Its a game of intimidation/abuse, and the trophy is a block. Whoop-dee-doo.
They validate each others existence on the internet by collecting in dark little corners sniggering about their boring negative little 'victories'.
The only good thing about people like this is that they are easily recognised by the arrogant and aggressive language they use.
I never catch those balls, go play somewhere else because me, and anyone I am friends with online ain't interested. Never give blocking a moron any more thought than it takes to press enter. :))
1
Marti
I can understand zero tolerance like Cyberninja says but with people that you know it may be a bit more difficult to do this without causing more problems. I agree though, if it is a troll just having fun, then they can go play with someone else!!