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Racism and cyberbullying.What are your thoughts?

3
Reflective_Joy
I thought I would touch on a topic that I am sure will resonate with many of you. Racism in cyberspace. Racism continues to be the elephant in the room. It can be both blatantly obvious or subtle. Though great strides have been made in the fight for equality, we still have a long way to go. As globalization and the digital age continues to move forward so does the ability for racism to infiltrate people's lives 24/7. Just like with cyberbullying, racist posts, tweets and texts can have very real damaging and lasting effect on youth and adults of all ages. But it doesn't have to.

We have the ability to stand up to racism in cyberspace and to end racially motivated cyberbullying. Furthermore, we can equip ourselves and others with the right coping strategies when we find ourselves witnessing or experiencing racism online. This can be done through supportive resources (Such as reaching out to the team here at Cybersmile) or through our own efforts of blocking and reporting to the site administrator, informing an adult or walking away from the discussion.

I realize this may be a very difficult discussion for many. But if you would like to openly discuss your experiences with racism, we welcome your posts below. Alternatively, you can of course reach out to the Cybersmile team via email for support.Just to get the discussion started;

Have you ever experienced racially motivated cyberbullying and if so what helped you get through it?

What kind of support would you like to see more of online to help those that are experiencing racism on social media or in gaming?
3
Adam
I hear and see racism in many different forms, not only on the internet but also in real life. The main difference with online racism is that it is easier to carry out under the cloak of anonymity. The flip side to this is that it is also easier to report when you come across it. This type of hate talk is top the dont list of many T&C's for forums, game chat and social media, so we should always report it when we see it. In real life we are often scared to speak out against bullying, sexism and racism when we see it, but online we are able to stand up for what we know to be right without fear.
1
David85
If site owners were doing their job, racism would be stamped out as unacceptable content, like child porn. But they hide behind the free speech flag, when all they are doing is ruining the internet for its users by letting this sort of crap carry on.
Yes, the users have a responsibility to stick to "codes of conduct" or "terms and conditions" but the ultimate responsibility lies with the site itself. They just cant wipe their hands of the problem.
1
Suzanne
Unfortunately racism is widespread online, I've seen accounts set up for the specific purpose of promoting racist material. I guess that's the price we pay for anonymity because surely nobody would be behaving in that way with their own identity on show?
I understand there are laws in place to prosecute racism, it might be good for the police to set an example!
1
GamerGirl
I see racism on the internet all the time. I've never seen much in real life but online it's everywhere.
It's very uncomfortable to look at but sometimes you can't help it, it's just there. That's what people don't realise about cyberbullying and abuse online that it's not just the intended victims that get hurt or upset but ALL the people that have to view their disgustingness as well! Please report any racist comments you see online.
1
Reflective_Joy

In reply to David85

You raise an excellent point David. Sites do need to take racism more seriously and to deal with it when it's seen or reported.

Does anyone know of any sites that are really great with monitoring or acknowledging users concerns and complaints about racist posts?
1
Reflective_Joy

In reply to Suzanne

You're right Suzanne. I definitely agree Anonymity does make it easier to post racist material and to continue to bully someone. But luckily IP addresses can, to some extent, help with finding the perpetrators. It depends on how prevalent and what site. Definitely more needs to be done.

I think you raise a good point, that authority figures like law enforcement need to demonstrate this racism will not be tolerated. I think the fact that it is seen as acceptable in law enforcement and other authoritative bodies-this sends the message to others that racism is no big deal. Though I know many are trying to fight racism within these sectors, more needs to be done.
0
AeonBlue
Well me and others are rather tired of petitioning Facebook to remove the Britain First FB group which is full of Hate crimes, FB policies are kinda retarded
0
Reflective_Joy

In reply to AeonBlue

AEONBLUE- I agree that pages that depict and promote hate are definitely an issue online. Facebook most certainty is known for not acting quickly or at all to these sorts of complaints. But you raise a very good point regarding the thin line that is "Free Speech".

Here's a question for all of you.

What does free speech mean to you? and where do we draw the line where it can become racist and/or include cyberbullying language and behavior?