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CBT in schools

5
JoDragon
How would you, or anyone you know think you'd respond to basic theories of CBT (Cognitive behavioural therapy) being taught in schools?

I know I've asked before about opinions of the victim of bullying being able to handle a situation accordingly, how their confidence can be brought up to avoid being bullied. I feel, like many, that we're in a society where emotions are very much shoved to one side and no one really teaches us how best to deal with them. You find these emotions become hidden and kept back even from loved ones and you feel no one really knows how you're feeling. Self esteem and confidence become servilely affected.

So what if concepts of CBT was taught in schools? How to differentiate between facts and opinions, how to pick out your own feelings and work them with accordingly. Would this help with people's mental state and therefore help reduce targets of bullying?

What do you think?
3
kitty
well I think people should tell a adult like a teacher or parents or sibling about it to see what they think and do what they tell you!!!
1
CybersmileHQ
Great topic, Jo. I agree that there should be more emotional education in schools to avoid mental health problems in future - being a young person is stressful enough and the complications of cyberbullying have only highlighted this further!

Emotional development would perhaps allow people to deal with their own feelings more easily as well as promoting empathy that would prevent bullying in the first place.

Where do we think this education should come in? PSHE?
1
CybersmileHQ

In reply to kitty

Kitty I think this is a good point - for some young people the whole point is that you're not quite developed enough yet to know this stuff! If we put emotional education and CBT techniques into the curriculum then we would help teens to discover this for themselves :)
0
CybersmileTeam
Excellent Jo, great topic! Emotional intelligence and various approaches including CBT are fantastic ways to facilitate change - especially around the cyberbullying and digital abuse space. I think teaching children how to healthily process online negativity and rationalise it would be very beneficial too, it's a new medium which needs new teaching methods : )
0
CybersmileTeam

In reply to kitty

Thanks Kitty : ) Great advice!
2
melia.pond
I'd agree with what's already been said, having CBT taught in schools would be very beneficial and help children as they grow up through their teens! I think it shouldn't be taught in citizenship or pshe as those subjects I feel should run alongside a lesson maybe once a week on CBT, both coping techniques but also ways to help others I think is a good one as often when in teenage years you become more aware of others emotions and as a friend you want to help. I think CBT either way needs go be encompassed into the regular time table!
And exactly what cybersmile ream said more needs to be done on the online side in particular as modern culture had changed and this plays more of a significant role! :)
2
Shamyla
Hey Jo and everyone, I am actually really glad you posted this threat up, I am currently trying to start a mental health preventative project up that goes into schools explaining mental health conditions via workshops and also teaching children and young people to develop resilience. I am studying CBT currently and I think it should be brought into the curriculum, well mental health should be brought more into the curriculum in PSHE lessons and considering how many things are done online nowadays more internet safety lessons should be done within schools as so many people are vulnerable online and they don't even know it until it is too late. Areas of the current curriculum and teaching does need to be modified to some extent because of the technology era we are now in.
1
Shamyla
thread* (autocorrect strikes again)
2
JoDragon
Thanks. I think being able to encourage and teach mental resilience is just such a massive part to both mental health and bullying. Like team said, being able to process negative comments healthily and rationalising will help stop so many young feeling victimised.
3
Shamyla
It will also help them not becoming bullies, research shows that people who have been victims of any type of bullying can become bullies themselves so if they developed a resilience to it then they can deal with it more healthily and rationalising like the team said :)
3
SuperDad
I'm starting to feel a lot better about my children going online with people like you guys around, more people need to know this is here...
1
kitty
Yes more people need to know about cybersmile now amd ot well probably stop bullying person by person!!! it would probably be good then and everyone would probably be much more happier than they are now like us when we get bullied!!
1
Marti
Originally posted by Shamyla
Hey Jo and everyone, I am actually really glad you posted this threat up, I am currently trying to start a mental health preventative project up that goes into schools explaining mental health conditions via workshops and also teaching children and young people to develop resilience. I am studying CBT currently and I think it should be brought into the curriculum, well mental health should be brought more into the curriculum in PSHE lessons and considering how many things are done online nowadays more internet safety lessons should be done within schools as so many people are vulnerable online and they don't even know it until it is too late. Areas of the current curriculum and teaching does need to be modified to some extent because of the technology era we are now in.

Excellent point of view, I totally agree. PSHE is the perfect vehicle for delivering CBT, emotional literacy, emotional intelligence type of education. All schools have a duty to address the wellbeing of students so this needs to be done. Teaching kids how to process emotions and manage their feelings is vital for their wellbeing and those around them.
1
Shamyla
More recognition has been placed on individuals mental health wellbeing so hopefully it wont be long till mental health and CBT is introduced into the curriculum the only barrier I can see is the training as PSHE teachers will need to study CBT in order to teach it effectively
1
JoDragon
I'm glad mental health is starting to be recognised in schools. I didn't know if there was already some sort of process happening.

An actual CBT course wouldn't be taught as it's usually 1-1 sessions but teaching the princibles will be just as effective such as rationalising and picking out fact from opinion.

I hope there will be funding somehow to teach possible teachers!
1
Jules92

In reply to Shamyla

I have read that in Singapore, SEL or Social Emotional Learning is now part of the curriculum and is considered as important as IQ and academic intelligence. It just makes sense to bring this into the school environment. Bullying is everyones problem and teaching kids from early years how to process emotions, ours and other peoples, can only be a good thing!
1
David85

In reply to Jules92

Also in America, Emotional Intelligence (SEL) is slowly being integrated into the school curriculum. The UK gov are really lagging on this issue and don't seem keen to take it on. There is more and more evidence suggesting that this is crucial in creating good citizens, something we hear about already in schools.
1
kirsty123
I did tell the bullies about that and they took the bullying to online
1
kitty

In reply to kirsty123

well Kirsty you have proof to show to someone and it would be better and i started school and my life got a little better exept for a couple people but mostly cuz most of them are in high school now! do im pretty much as happy as i can be
0
AeonBlue
CBT is the most bogus pseudo scientific bs seriously so many top of their field Psychologists are speaking out against it being used as a quick fix cure all.
1
Surferchickita
I think that as long as its actually taught by people in the field ie. a psychologist it could be beneficial to young people. Bu if it were taught by teachers who maybe don't have such a great understanding of t, it could do more harm than good.